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Mahama never interfered with ‘Dumsor’ timetable -Nana Yaa Jantuah

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Nana Yaa Jantuah, the former Director of Public Relations and External Affairs at the Public Utilities Regulatory Commission (PURC), has highlighted former President John Dramani Mahama’s management of power challenges during his presidency.

Notably, the term ‘Dumsor’, a colloquialism for persistent power outages emerged during Mahama’s tenure, when the country experienced intense and frequent electricity shortages.

In an interview with Umaru Sanda Amadu on Face to Face on Channel One TV, Nana Yaa Jantuah recalled how the former president refrained from meddling with the “Dumsor” timetable, allowing the energy sector managers to operate independently without political interference.

She praised Mahama for his non-interferent approach, which she said enabled the sector managers to take charge and make decisions without political pressure.

When asked about former President Mahama’s handling of the PURC timetable during the ‘dumsor’ era, Nana Yaa Jantuah replied, “He was in support of it and wanted the load shedding timetable” to be implemented.

She further revealed that although the load-shedding timetable had made his administration unpopular, Mahama never interfered with it, choosing to allow the experts to manage the situation without political pressure.

“He was for it, and he wanted the load-shedding timetable. No, he never interfered, to be very honest, I really enjoyed working with him because I had worked with former president John Kufuor and other former presidents. Most of them were suspicious, but Mahama was very open. He made work so easy, he didn’t politicise it. At a point, his people were even upset because there were so many demonstrations… Mahama didn’t think about politics when it came to the energy sector,” She said.

Nana Yaa Jantuah also noted that former President Mahama never exerted executive influence over electricity tariffs, instead allowing the regulatory body to independently determine and set tariffs, free from political interference.

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