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UK goes after Ghana’s High Commission over £5 million unpaid congestion charges

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The Transport for London (TfL) and the UK government are in the process of reclaiming congestion charge payments from more than 20 nations, including Ghana, for unpaid dues dating back 20 years (2003-2023).

Diplomatic missions have accumulated over £143 million in unpaid congestion charges, with the Ghana High Commission’s debt alone surpassing £5 million.

Leading the list of debts, the US Embassy owes more than £14 million, while the embassies of Japan and Togo have outstanding charges of over £10 million and £40, respectively.

TfL, in a statement observed by Citi News on Monday, emphasised that the congestion charge is considered a service charge by the UK government and TfL, not a tax, which implies that diplomatic missions are obligated to pay it.

While the majority of embassies comply, a persistent minority has continued to evade payment, despite diplomatic efforts to resolve the issue.

“This means that diplomats are not exempt from paying it. The majority of embassies in London do pay the charge, but there remains a stubborn minority who refuse to do so, despite our representations through diplomatic channels,” it added.

TfL has reiterated its determination to recover all outstanding congestion charge fees and associated penalties and is considering bringing the matter before the International Court of Justice for resolution.

Currently, the Nigerian High Commission owes in excess of £8.3 million, the Embassy of Sudan is liable for over £3.9 million, and the Kenya High Commission has debts amounting to over £3.2 million.

GOA5RGBWYAAlsKj Channel1 News UK goes after Ghana's High Commission over £5 million unpaid congestion charges

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